Working with TOSCA (Part 2)

28 04 2013

This has been a long overdue post from my end, and as I now have some time at hand, thought it was better to put it down.

TOSCA has been promoted by Tricentis in Australia for the past 3+ years now and has risen from being an unknown tool in the ANZ markets to now in the 2nd position after the ever prevalent QTP (although under HP’s banner, it has undergone a lot of iterations and name changes also now). Tricentis has used the MBT principles to create TOSCA as an easy to use and implement tool. It allows the test team to concentrate on creating the actual workflow of the application, from the ‘artifacts’ provided in the initial ‘Requirement’ and ‘Test Case Design’ sections. From then, it is a simple case of either matching these test workflows with the appropriate screen objects (‘Modules’), or running them manually [yes, you can run ‘Test Case’ created in TOSCA as manual or automated tests]. TOSCA provides a section for ‘Reports’, which is in PDF format or from the ‘Requirement’ tab, which provides an overview of what has been created, what is automated and what has passed/failed. The ‘Execution List’ tab provides a simplistic way to define the different ways (and environments) in which you can run your test cases.

As I wrote in my previous post, TOSCA should be started from the Requirements of the application, where the application is broken into workflows and each is assigned a weight-age  This provides the base for creating the test cases in our ‘Test Case Design’ section.

The ‘Test Case Design’ is the interesting part (and claimed by Tricentis, as not being used by any other tool, as yet). Here you need to dissect the requirements and application to create each attribute and assign its relevant ‘equivalence partitioning‘. Sometimes this may not be necessary and  the TCD acts like a data sheet for the test team.

For most automation tools, you begin with the application and then match it with the requirements. TOSCA wants you to start from the requirements and build it to the actual tests. Then you add in the actual application and you are on the way to creating a well thought out automation or manual test practice.

Now TOSCA v7.6.x has come out with a new Cross-Browser testing concept called TBox. This allows you to create a ‘Module’ in one of the main browsers, and be used across IE, Chrome and FF.

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One response

26 11 2014
Former tosca user

I used tosca for 1 year it might fit for some people, but if you want to run automated tests against a web UI then in my opinion the best out there is not QTP or Tosca but selenium by a mile, and the best thing is it’s free.
http://docs.seleniumhq.org/

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