Test Coverage – A Concept!

24 10 2011

These days I am trying to work on a concept known as Test Coverage. I call this a concept, as it starts off with something in the mind of the Management, fetters down to the Manager and finally is handed down to the Tester to carry out the said instructions. Without actually realizing, soon a graphical representation of our work comes out, in something which people call Business Intelligence (another much-hyped word these days, but will come to it later). The graphical representation goes on to show that the current set of tests which have been implemented/created, cover either “X” lines of code or “Y” number of Business Screens.

Is this a true representation of the complete scenario? Not what a Test Manager or a Dev Manager, who has enough thought process would like to think so. The above is a misnomer of how we go about treating an important issue like Test Coverage. Let me take you through a typical “Software Test Life Cycle” (don’t even start me off on that one). The requirements come out in the form of a BIG bunch of documentation, which has gone through various iterations and reviews with the Business people and the other Stake Holders involved (but rarely the Test Team). This bunch of neatly typed bundle is handed over to the Test Team in an official ceremony, which we call the “Beginning of the Test Cycle”. The Test Manager goes over this vast bundle of joyous documentation and then based on his “past” experiences, provides an estimate of what all will need testing and what test cases can be broadly done. This is called the “Estimation Period”, as usually a rough time period is provided, on when the Test Team will finish – includes Automation, Manual, Performance, Security and the jig-bang.

Once this “Estimation Period” is through, the task is handed over to the Leads to break down and offer an estimate, but based on what the Test Manager has already provided. Till this time, the actual team members are usually not taken into consultation, but the seniors of the Team are the confidants who will decide on what the underlings do. Finally a document starts taking shape, which for the sake of convenience we call the “Test Plan” or the “Test Strategy“, for want of a better name. This soon becomes the golden Bible/Vedas for the Test Team and they have to adhere to what has been said in it. Thereby the official STLC starts!

Once you have converted the BRD (Business Requirement Document) or the PRD (Product Requirement Document) to your test cases, you need to start actually implementing those test cases. This is the place where you start bringing in concepts like Test Matrix and Test Vectors, which in layman parlance (developer speak) mean the way that your tests are structured across the various data points for a particular view on the application. Now comes the really good part! This also lies the place where the above mentioned superior tester comes out and says that we are doing a Test Coverage of “X” lines of code, or a “Y” number of business screens (for GUI applications, which usually is 90% of tested applications). But does he actually know what he has covered with his test cases? Some do, while some have just made the assumptions, after reading blogs such as this one or from their superiors, who again might have obtained their knowledge from such places. The test cases are sorted out and some go over to the Automation Team to put in their regression suite, while others are manually vetted out and put through the paces of the “Bug Life Cycle”! (what this means to the globally scattered teams, depends on how much the management has spent of procuring a good issue reporting tool. My recommendation would be to look into Joel Spolsky’s FogBugz: http://www.fogcreek.com/fogbugz/). But to each his own …

Once the case of creating test cases and shoving them into the Automated Test Suite is completed, the Test Manager will jump and click a variety of buttons on his console (something which has been created by his Team to make life a brisk walk for him Or the Management has spent some more Money into procuring another one of those efficient tools out there). Thus, voila, a beautifully colored report of what passed and what failed, and specially “How much of Code/Screens were covered by our Testing”. Definitely a piece of Beauty for the Management!

But what is the real usefulness of such a report! In my honest opinion (IMHO), zilch… NIL! We did a good job of covering all the lines of code which were there, but did we cover the paths through which the code would be executed, I don’t think that is thought of even 25% of the time. Did we make sure that boundary values are covered? it might be that we have a few test cases making sure of this, but do they map to our coverage? Did we take care of the definite values that a few fields on our screen work on? No, this would be a definite gap most of the time… What we did do was this – a) Ensure that at least 85-90% of the code lines are covered by our test cases, executed using the Automated Scripts (Good! This might be an issue with doing through Manual tests, so no offence to Manual Testing here). b) Made sure that all the GUI screens are covered.

But, did we make sure that all the fields on that screen are covered, usually not. These are the places where we get issues. Also, most of time Negative testing is not given enough importance in such cases. The usual rant being – a) Did not have time. b) Is not that important, as such a case would not happen in Production? But these are important things and they convey the coverage of our tests. I will try to bring out more facets of this testing type in my next few posts and hopefully those are more helpful, than this one, which just rants about what is not being tested and/or how badly we test things …

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Regression Testing

28 05 2010

Regression with an automated test suite is a frequently used/abused phrase. People need to first understand what “regression” actually means.

Regression testing in a nutshell relates to the activity, by which we check a new application/product, for all the previous functionality; while keeping the newly added features unused. Basically, we validate that the new code has no effect on the older functionality. Regression is not used/should not be used to check for a functionality which has changed. As a change in functionality means that it is a new feature and needs to be verified first before it is validated.





Cardinal Rule for Automation

28 05 2010

So let me first state what is the first rule we learn about Automation of the testing for any project/product: Do not automate anything before the application comes to a stable state. But seems like this basic rule of Automation is forgotten by people when they become managers. Or they have never done any automation and feel that anything and everything should and must be automated to make any impact.

Well! People need to understand that Automation is not just a buzzword which needs to be done to create an impact on your own ratings and seniors. It is a serious study and work, which needs to be carefully thought out and then worked on through the design, development and minimal of maintenance. Not something which just on the whim and fancy of saying that Automation is on the agenda and has been completed.

Update: I fully agree with what @meDilbert has to say. Automation has become a word in process trainings and the CV’s of people wanting to portray that they have worked on it. It brings accolades to the person who implements it and brickbats for those who even mention that it might be nonviable. 🙂